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SALE 2413 / LOT 101
 
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  A SILVER THREE-PIECE TEA SERVICE
MARK OF EPHRAIM BRASHER, NEW YORK, CIRCA 1785

Price Realized
$8,125

Lot Description

A SILVER THREE-PIECE TEA SERVICE
MARK OF EPHRAIM BRASHER, NEW YORK, CIRCA 1785
Comprising a teapot, covered sugar bowl and cream jug; oval or vase form, with beaded borders and bright-cut foliate and floral swags, the teapot and cream jug engraved with monogram JMNB, the sugar urn with similar monogram JNMB; the teapot marked under base, the cream jug marked on foot, the sugar urn apparently unmarked
The teapot 10½ in. (26.6 cm.) long, 37 oz. (1,152 gr.) gross weight (3)

Pre-Lot Text

PROPERTY OF HSH PRINCESS MARIE-LOUISE RADZIWILL

Provenance

John Nicholas Bleecker (1739-1825), of Albany and Margaret Van Deusen, married circa 1775
Margaret Bleecker (1776-1878), daughter, married Col. John Van Schaick (1776-1820) of Albany
Elisa Van Schaick, daughter, married Simeon de Witt Bloodgood
Robert Fanshaw Bloodgood, son, married Elise Pirson
John Van Schaick Bloodgood, son, married distinguished equestrian and author Lida Louise Fleitmann
Lida Lacey Bloodgood, daughter, married HSH Prince Dominick Radziwill in 1948
HSH Princess Marie-Louise Radziwill, daughter, sculptress

Lot Notes

John Nicholas Bleecker was an aggressive leader during the Revolutionary years in Albany, and assumed an important role after the capture of Fort Ticonderoga in 1775. Albany was an especially vital hub of Revolutionary activity. The city was the seat of the Albany Conference in 1754, where Benjamin Franklin was among those who drafted the Albany Plan of Union, precursor to the Declaration of Independence.

Early in the 1760s, Bleecker became a contractor with Albany's municipal government, which was largely in favor of independence. He also served as Alderman to the Albany Corporation from 1767, a position to which he was reelected for several years, as well as on the Committee of Correspondence, founded to promote colonists' rights following the Intolerable Acts of 1774.

When the War began, Bleecker was made Assistant Deputy Commissary General of Store and Provisions in New York, and was instrumental in the transfer of munitions seized from Fort Ticonderoga to reinforce the defense of Boston in the spring of 1776. Bleecker's contributions to the Revolution were rewarded by New York State with an allocation of land bounty rights. After the War, he continued serving in Albany's city government until his death in 1825.

For additional information see: The John N. Bleecker Papers, 1700-1870, at the New York State Library and the Colonial Albany Social History Project, directed by Stephan Bielinski, the New York State Museum.

Department Information

Silver & Objects of Vertu

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